New to Netball Coaching - Netball Rules

New to Netball Coaching – Netball Rules

Congratulations on becoming a new coach!

At first it can feel overwhelming. You may feel like you’re in over your head. It’s normal to be nervous or worried that you won’t be good enough, that you might not be able to do the job well. If any of these feelings sound familiar, don’t worry – they’re completely normal!

Our New to Netball Coaching blog includes a series of articles that will walk through some key areas of coaching and provide tips to help you get off to a good start.

Netball Rules

In a previous article, we provided An Introduction to Netball. Here we will build on this by providing some additional information and resources to help those new to netball coaching.

The International Netball Federation defines Netball as “a game in which two teams of seven players each strive to keep or gain possession of the ball. The team with the ball, through running, jumping, throwing and catching, attempts to move the ball into its goal circle from where a goal may be scored, while the opposing team uses defensive movements and strategies to prevent this and to gain possession. The team with the greater number of goals is the winner of the match. Players have specified areas in which they can move. Play restarts after each goal with teams having alternate possession.”

The International Netball Federation introduced an updated edition of the Rules of Netball in November 2019, which applies to international matches, and all affiliated competitions and events in Australia from 1 January 2020. Although not completely necessary to start netball coaching, you may purchase this from various retailers or Netball Australia.

Netball Terms

If you are new, not only to coaching but also to the game of Netball, you will quickly hear many ‘Netball Terms’.

From stepping, to obstruction, pivot or feeding and it can seem mind-boggling at first. No need to worry, googling these terms should help you find some explanations or we have put together some Free Netball Resources for you.

Our New to Netball Coaching bundle, includes a number of printable documents. One of which, outlines some of the most common Netball Terms you will hear around the court.

Simply sign up to our mailing list to get your copy.

Areas of a Netball Court

A standard netball court is 30.5 metres long (sidelines) and 15.25 metres wide (known as goal line or baseline).

The court is then divided into equal thirds (via transverse lines).

The centre third is where the centre circle is located. Play restarts from the centre circle after each goal with teams having alternate possession. While the two thirds which bookend the court are where the goals circles are located.

The goal post is placed at the midpoint of each goal line.

At a height of 305 cm (10ft) for adults and professional players or modified to 244 cm (9ft) for children between the age of 7 and 9.

Areas of a Netball Court

Netball Court Playing Areas

Each playing position has specific areas of the court they can enter during game play.

Goal Shooter (GS): Only allowed in the attacking goal third, including the shooting circle. 

Goal Attack (GA): Allowed in both the centre third and attacking goal third including the shooting circle.

Wing Attack (WA): Allowed in both the centre third and the attacking goal third, however they are not allowed in the shooting circle.

Centre (C): Allowed in all three thirds of the netball court except for the shooting circles at either end of the court.

Wing Defense (WD): Allowed in the centre and defensive thirds, however they are not allowed in the shooting circle.

Goal Defense (GD): Allowed in both the centre third and their defensive third, including the shooting circle.

Goal Keeper (GK): Only allowed in their defensive goal third, including the shooting circle.

Our New to Netball Coaching bundle, also includes a printable document highlighting each positions playing area.

Who should take a Free Pass or Throw In

Now that you are familiar with each netball position and the associated playing areas. It is helpful to understand and teach players which position should take a Free Pass or Throw in.

Although each situation is unique and game strategy may influence your preference. We have created a general guide with a court diagram, suggesting who should should take a Free Pass or Throw In, based on the location this has occurred on court.

This document is also included in the New to Netball Coaching bundle.

Simply sign up to our mailing list to get your copy.

New Coach Starter Kit

We hope this article and resources, provide you a greater understanding of the game of Netball and will assist in your journey as a Netball Coach.

Best of luck!